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[Applause]Everytime we finish a book we post here[Praise] (88)


1 Name: Bookworm : 2008-06-11 06:20 ID:CwXuimoY

http://4-ch.net/games/kareha.pl/1206548566/
This is a nice thread. Let's have a book edition.

I just read my first book by Haruki Murakami, "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle". Murakami gets a lot of praise in these parts, and after reading this book, I can confirm that it isn't unfounded. The book to me felt a bit weaker towards the end, but I really liked hearing the stories of Nomonhan, Siberia, and such.

79 Name: Bookworm : 2014-10-19 11:50 ID:IIVJ6/D1

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner

Has some interesting ideas that are statistically accurate, but won't convince anyone. A short read with very interesting ideas. If you're into controversy, it turns out that abortion is actually a very good thing from a very limited economic perspective. Then again, Rhodesia was a very good thing from a very limited economic perspective (but also made no one happy).

80 Name: Bookworm : 2014-10-19 11:59 ID:IIVJ6/D1

The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice by Christopher Hitchens

Not sure when my mother got all super atheist, but it was right around the time she retired and didn't have to be polite to anyone ever again. So I got this book (or long essay?) shoved in my face.

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81 Name: Bookworm : 2014-10-19 12:15 ID:IIVJ6/D1

Rossiya: Voices from the Brezhnev Era by Alex Shinshin

A slightly interesting memoir of a trek across the USSR and the Eastern Bloc in the 1970s. Traveling from Vladivostok to Poland, Shinshin most-memorably notes subtle instances of Soviet rebellion in an era when supposedly no such thing existed. If you're into this sort of thing, you'll like it. Otherwise, you'll wonder why I'm even bothering to type so many (72) words about it.

82 Name: Bookworm : 2014-10-19 12:50 ID:IIVJ6/D1

The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason by Sam Harris

OM[Undefined], we get it. Christian/Islamic fundamentalism is awful. We know. This book seems to insist we can be "spiritual" without any god and that mostly involves Buddhism. Sure, whatever dude. The Buddha gets his oranges and incense as part of my personal superstition, and I live your dream or not, or whatever. In the meantime, my adopted gods have obviously acquired a taste for Clif Crunchy Peanut Butter Energy Bars in addition to their favorite bananas, as evidenced by my good fortune in traveling the South Pacific. Watch me fail to give a fuck and continue to leave offerings for the good of my wayward traveling companions who give their offerings to the wrong piles of rocks. I guess this might appeal to you if you have never once heard of an alternative worldview. Otherwise: atheism, yadda, yadda, yadda, the most-logical option.

83 Name: Bookworm : 2014-10-19 21:21 ID:5fd+TWfJ

fag

84 Name: Bookworm : 2014-10-19 21:39 ID:IIVJ6/D1

Sorry, I can't believe there's such a market for these books.

85 Name: Bookworm : 2014-11-02 07:47 ID:IIVJ6/D1

The Russia House by John le Carré

Imagine James Bond told from the perspective of his accountants. It's kind of like that. Except imagine that the James Bond in question fell into spying after his career in banking fell through. Not sure why this was forced on me, but hey, it offers some highly fictionalized accounts of the everyday early Perestroika-era Soviet lifestyle and I dig that for some reason. An entirely bureaucratic spy novel.

86 Name: Bookworm : 2014-11-02 08:08 ID:IIVJ6/D1

The Vast Unknown by Broughton Coburn

It's about the first American expedition to the summit of Mount Everest. After having been beaten in the race to #1 in nearly everyone else by 1963, Americans seek to play catch up in mountaineering too. Notable for a few technical firsts, the expedition was otherwise routine, including the death of one member. As far as these books go, it's OK. The best part is mention of the Camel cigarettes tie-in promotion. Oh, 1963, you so silly.

87 Name: Bookworm : 2014-11-02 09:11 ID:IIVJ6/D1

The Greenlanders by Jane Smiley

Difficult to read if only because everyone has a difficult name. Gives a highly-fictionalized account of the many trials of the Norse Greenlanders in a style sort-of reminiscent of the sagas. Greenlanders were the hardest of Viking remnants, who managed to eke out an existence through primitive pastoralism in the worst theoretically-habitable place on earth. They did this for close to five hundred (miserable) years. They died out due to isolation, climate change, and invasion on two fronts. Take note, Western World! Or read about Rapa Nui, I guess.

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88 Name: Bookworm : 2014-11-09 10:32 ID:IIVJ6/D1

The World Without Us by Alan Weisman

Taken from a series of magazine articles, it sure has that feel to it. Interesting stuff, most of which is plastic is bad, m'kay. If you deny the human influence on climate change, then buy six copies, have them delivered overnight air, burn them, read it on your good iPad and have a good laugh. Otherwise, it might make you a little nervous about the future.